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Recent News

From Perspectives on Psychological Science: Reexamining the Findings of the American Psychological Association’s 2015 Task Force on Violent Media: A Meta-Analysis

In Academic, Family, Featured Article, Peer-Reviewed Article, Pop Culture, Public News, Research

In 2015, the American Psychological Association (APA) released a task-force technical report on video-game violence with a concurrent resolution statement linking violent games to aggression but not violent crime. The task-force report has proven to be controversial; many scholars have criticized language implying conclusive evidence linking violent games to aggression as well as technical concerns regarding the meta-analysis that formed the basis of the technical report and resolution statement.

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From Cognitive-Behaviour Therapy: Eye movement desensitization and reprocessing for mental health problems: a systematic review and meta-analysis

In Academic, Clinical, Featured Article, Peer-Reviewed Article, Therapy

Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) was developed in the late 1980s as a psychological treatment for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) (Shapiro, 1989). It was based on the observation that the intensity of traumatic memories can be reduced through eye movements.

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From Journal of Psychiatry Research: Landscape of Cognitive Functioning in Recovered COVID-19

In Academic, Featured Article, Peer-Reviewed Article, Research

It has been reported that most of SARS patients had the common complaints, such as poor concentration, declined memory, and insomnia, as well as anxiety and depression symptoms, indicating cognitive impairments after SARS infection (Sheng et al., 2005a). These psychiatric morbidities might be still significant even when patients infected with SARS recovered physically...

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